Singapura Cat - Medium Sized Cat

The Singapura Cat is one of the smallest breeds of cats, noted for its large eyes and ears, brown ticked coat and blunt tail. Reportedly established from three "drain cats" imported from Singapore in the 1970s, it was later revealed that the cats were originally sent to Singapore from the US before they were exported back to the US. Investigations by the Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA) concluded no wrongdoing and the Singapura kept its status as a natural breed.

The Singapura Cat is a moderately stocky and muscular small to medium-sized cat, with a very short and fine coat. A full grown female usually weighs 5-6 pounds while the male weighs 6-8 pounds. The large, slightly pointed and deep cupped ears together with the large almond shaped eyes are characteristics of the breed. The tail is slender, slightly shorter than the length of the body and has a blunt tip.

The breed's coat pattern is that of a ticked tabby. That is, individual hair strands have alternating sections of dark and light color, typically two dark bands separated by two light bands, with a dark color at the tip. The underside, including the chest, muzzle and chin, takes the color of the light bands. The Singapura Cat is recognized by cat registries in only one color, the sepia agouti, described as "dark brown ticking on a warm old ivory ground color".

The Singapura Cat is described by the CFA as active, curious and playful. They are affectionate and desire human interaction. They have a tendency to perch on high places, to allow them a better view of their surrounding.

In the UK, a pet-quality Singapura can cost £300-400 (US$500-600 USD) while a show specimen can cost upwards of £600.


Of concern to breeders is the condition known as uterine inertia, an inability to expel the fetus due to weak muscles. This condition was present in one of the foundation cats and appears in some Singapura Cat females today. Individuals with uterine inertia may require deliveries to be made by Caesarean section.

There are no other known genetic health problems in the Singapura Cat, although breeders have shown concern regarding the genetic diversity of the breed due to inbreeding caused by a small gene pool. Researchers who completed the 2007 DNA study found that the Singapura Cat (along with the Burmese) have the least genetic diversity among the 22 breeds studied. The possibility of outcrossing with another breed to increase the genetic diversity had been raised among CFA breeders, but not many were receptive to the idea, preferring to use Singapuras from around the world that are not so closely related to the CFA line.

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